What happened to the Messenger Plus! forums on msghelp.net?
Shoutbox » MsgHelp Archive » Skype & Technology » Tech Talk » Wireless network/Newbie questions

Pages: (2): « First [ 1 ] 2 » Last »
Wireless network/Newbie questions
Author: Message:
alegator
Senior Member
****


Posts: 569
Reputation: 4
Joined: Nov 2004
O.P. Huh?  Wireless network/Newbie questions
Hi, I'm currently using a Win XP SP3 PC connected to the internet using a Cisco ADSL modem physically connected via a network cable to the PC's network card (so no wireless). I bought a netbook that has WiFi that I plan to use in my home. So I also bought a Cisco WRT54GL wireless router. My plan is to keep the PC physically connected to the internet and the Netbook accessing ADSL via wireless. So the basic config would be:
- The ADSL signal cable going to the Cisco ADSL modem
- A network cable going from the Cisco ADSL modem to the Cisco Router
- A network cable going from the Cicso router to the PC
- The netbook accessing the internet via wireless using the router.
My question is:
1) When I'm not using the netbook, can I disable (or turn off) the routers wireless transmissions so that it acts only as a physical router? If so, how?
2) Will placing the router between the modem and the PC in the above described manner affect the internet speed (lower)?
3) Will the router (acting in physical mode only, i.e., no wireless) add an extra layer of security for the PC? Will I still need to keep the PC's installed software firewall (I'm using NIS2011)?
4) Does installing the router imply changing many of Windows' settings? Is it easy to revert back to the PC' original state if I ever decide to uninstall the router to the original config?
Thanks.
06-08-2011 08:43 AM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
mezzanine
Full Member
***

Avatar

Posts: 106
Reputation: 23
Joined: May 2005
Status: Away
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
1) You can do that manually via the router's web interface; the wireless access point can be disabled when you're not using it. If security is your concern, there are multiple mechanisms you can configure to prevent unauthorized access, including MAC address based filtering. The access point also automatically adjusts its transmitting power based on the number and position of connected devices.

2) For the cabled devices no. Wireless devices will be limited to the access rate of the wireless standard used (also by half duplex).

3) Although it can't compare to a full featured stateful firewall solution, the router will keep your network behind a NAT, adding a layer of security.

4) No, you usually don't have to change anything. However, some applications will require the use of the port forwarding mechanism on the router to be able to listen to incoming connections.
06-08-2011 10:58 AM
Profile PM Web Find Quote Report
alegator
Senior Member
****


Posts: 569
Reputation: 4
Joined: Nov 2004
O.P. RE: RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
quote:
Originally posted by mezzanine
1) You can do that manually via the router's web interface; the wireless access point can be disabled when you're not using it. If security is your concern, there are multiple mechanisms you can configure to prevent unauthorized access, including MAC address based filtering. The access point also automatically adjusts its transmitting power based on the number and position of connected devices.
Thanks messanine. Regarding security, I also read I have the choice of either WEP or WPA (I read WPA is better), and also the ability to use encryption. Are all of the security options that you mention manageable through the router's web interface? Is the MAC address unique to each hardware or can it be cloned? I guess I can also unscrew the two antennas from the back of the unit when wireless is not in use for an added security. Thanks
06-08-2011 12:30 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
matty
Scripting Guru
*****


Posts: 8337
Reputation: 109
34 / Male / Flag
Joined: Dec 2002
Status: Away
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
If you really want to add as many possible layers as possible consider doing the following:
- Do not broadcast your SSID
- Accept only 802.11 G connections
- Use WPA2 (AES+TKIP)
- Setup MAC address filtering on the wireless so that only trusted MAC addresses can connect

- Obviously even when your SSID isn't broadcasted it can still be detected (IE via NetStumbler)
- All devices these days support 802.11 G
- WPA2 I am not sure if it can be cracked yet but WPA can
- MAC's can be spoofed (they are unique between each device, the first few bits are identical between manufacturers) however guessing the exact MAC of your NIC is next to impossible.


If you really want to screw with people then leave your WIFI open/unsecured and have a radius server that you must authenticate to :P

This post was edited on 06-08-2011 at 12:51 PM by matty.
06-08-2011 12:50 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
Menthix
forum admin
*******

Avatar

Posts: 5534
Reputation: 102
35 / Male / Flag
Joined: Mar 2002
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
quote:
Originally posted by matty
- Do not broadcast your SSID
- Accept only 802.11 G connections
- Use WPA2 (AES+TKIP)
- Setup MAC address filtering on the wireless so that only trusted MAC addresses can connect
Of all those WPA2 WPA2 (AES+TKIP) is the only one really adding security. Others don't add much security for the reasons you already pointed out, although they don't hurt if you want to put up with the hassle. What matters most is your passkey. WPA2 can still be bruteforced, same rules apply as with a password:
- Non-dictionary
- Length
- Mixing types of characters
Finish the problem
Menthix.net | Contact Me
06-08-2011 01:31 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Web Find Quote Report
matty
Scripting Guru
*****


Posts: 8337
Reputation: 109
34 / Male / Flag
Joined: Dec 2002
Status: Away
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
Straight from Microsoft: http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/passwords-create.aspx (Y)

quote:
Originally posted by Menthix
quote:
Originally posted by matty
- Do not broadcast your SSID
- Accept only 802.11 G connections
- Use WPA2 (AES+TKIP)
- Setup MAC address filtering on the wireless so that only trusted MAC addresses can connect
Of all those WPA2 WPA2 (AES+TKIP) is the only one really adding security. Others don't add much security for the reasons you already pointed out, although they don't hurt if you want to put up with the hassle. What matters most is your passkey. WPA2 can still be bruteforced, same rules apply as with a password:
- Non-dictionary
- Length
- Mixing types of characters
The reason I suggested doing the aforementioned is because most people won't know how to get around it.

This post was edited on 06-08-2011 at 02:38 PM by matty.
06-08-2011 02:36 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
foaly
Senior Member
****

Avatar

Posts: 718
Reputation: 20
33 / Male / Flag
Joined: Jul 2006
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
quote:
Originally posted by matty
The reason I suggested doing the aforementioned is because most people won't know how to get around it.
then again, if they can break WPA2, they will know how to get around all the other measures :P
[signature.jpg]
06-08-2011 05:31 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
matty
Scripting Guru
*****


Posts: 8337
Reputation: 109
34 / Male / Flag
Joined: Dec 2002
Status: Away
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
quote:
Originally posted by foaly
quote:
Originally posted by matty
The reason I suggested doing the aforementioned is because most people won't know how to get around it.
then again, if they can break WPA2, they will know how to get around all the other measures :P
I don't disagree with you, however I don't know if WPA2 has been cracked yet. I know WEP and WPA have been.
06-08-2011 06:01 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
foaly
Senior Member
****

Avatar

Posts: 718
Reputation: 20
33 / Male / Flag
Joined: Jul 2006
RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
quote:
Originally posted by matty
quote:
Originally posted by foaly
quote:
Originally posted by matty
The reason I suggested doing the aforementioned is because most people won't know how to get around it.
then again, if they can break WPA2, they will know how to get around all the other measures :P
I don't disagree with you, however I don't know if WPA2 has been cracked yet. I know WEP and WPA have been.
TKIP has been IIRC, but WPA2 TKIP+AES not yet...
[signature.jpg]
06-08-2011 06:05 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
alegator
Senior Member
****


Posts: 569
Reputation: 4
Joined: Nov 2004
O.P. RE: Wireless network/Newbie questions
Does the WRT54GL router support WPA2? If not, will flashing the firmware with either Tomato or DD-WRT provide WPA2 suppport?

This post was edited on 06-08-2011 at 06:10 PM by alegator.
06-08-2011 06:10 PM
Profile E-Mail PM Find Quote Report
Pages: (2): « First [ 1 ] 2 » Last »
« Next Oldest Return to Top Next Newest »


Threaded Mode | Linear Mode
View a Printable Version
Send this Thread to a Friend
Subscribe | Add to Favorites
Rate This Thread:

Forum Jump:

Forum Rules:
You cannot post new threads
You cannot post replies
You cannot post attachments
You can edit your posts
HTML is Off
myCode is On
Smilies are On
[img] Code is On